Posts Tagged: ‘body’

Interview Body Language

May 26, 2011 Posted by

One of the first things you’ll probably do in an interview is shake hands with your interviewer. The handshake is a simple symbol of introduction. But it can also be an unspoken gauge of personality. Hiring managers say that while a limp or unenthusiastic handshake won’t destroy an interview, it can cause one to start off on a bad note. The same goes for a sweaty palm. To alleviate the latter problem, be sure to keep your hands open, not balled into fists, prior to your interview. This will reduce perspiration. Put a handkerchief or a few tissues in your pocket, just in case. Also remember that while a limp handshake is bad, a bone-breaking handshake isn’t much better. Clasp your interviewer’s hand firmly and confidently, but don’t overdo.

MAINTAIN EYE CONTACT

A lack of eye contact during an interview can lead your interviewer to think that you’re shy, disinterested, or dishonest. Likewise, shifting your eyes to and from the interviewer’s face can also send the wrong message. It’s no wonder “shifty-eyed” is a term used to describe a character who is deceitful or insincere. While you don’t want to stare at your interviewer to the point making him uncomfortable, do maintain eye contact as much as seems appropriate. If you are speaking to more than one interviewer, you can shift your gaze, but be sure to look each interviewer in the eye for at least a couple of seconds.

WATCH YOUR BODY LANGUAGE

The term “body language” includes just about any manner, gesture, or posture that conveys meaning to the observer. Body language is especially meaningful in an interview as your interviewer will be paying attention to nonverbal cues as much as to what you have to say Body language to avoid in an interview includes repeatedly crossing and uncrossing your legs or arms, fiddling with your hair or clothes, touching your face, scratching your head, or playing with a button or pen. Constant or bold gesturing is also to be avoided. Some of these mannerisms may be triggered by nervousness. Interview preparation and rehearsal may help you to feel more relaxed. Body language that might give your interview a boost includes leaning forward slightly to show your enthusiasm and nodding whenever is appropriate, particularly when your interviewer is making an important point.

SMILE WHEN YOU MEAN IT

Smiling, the universal sign of happiness, is a great way to convince your interviewer that you’re genuinely pleased to be there. On the other hand, an oversized or artificial grin used too often during the interview will lead to the opposite result. Your interviewer will know you’re forcing yourself to act a certain way.

According to Discover Magazine, when a person is sincerely amused, a part of the brain called the basal ganglia is activated, leading to the unconscious contracting of certain facial muscles. A forced smile, however, uses a different group of muscles, which is why it’s generally easy to spot a person who is legitimately pleased from one who is only pretending to be.

During an interview, be sure to smile-but only when you mean it. It’s infinitely better to smile occasionally but earnestly than to smirk constantly for no reason at all.

BE MINDFUL OF PERSONAL SPACE

Individual cultures and even individual people have different interpretations of what constitutes an appropriate amount of personal space. While one person might feel at ease speaking only inches from someone’s face, another person might need several feet of separation. When facing your interviewer, be mindful of how close you stand or sit. Try to maintain a distance of about three feet. Communicating at a closer range may cause your interviewer to feel uncomfortable. On the other hand, sitting or standing too far away is also impolite.

Kermit Browning – About the Author:

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Feng Shui For Job Interview – Five Powerful Body Language Tips to Ace Your Next Job Interview

May 24, 2011 Posted by

Feng Shui For Job Interview – Five Powerful Body Language Tips to Ace Your Next Job Interview

Getting a job in today’s tough economy is hard. The current recession is characterized by unusually high levels of unemployment, which makes it harder than ever for the unemployed to get back on their feet and back into the workforce. There are too many people competing for too few positions resulting in a job search process that is often be brutal, depressing and all too often unsuccessful. It is not enough to be qualified and to have all the right references, you often need an additional edge to separate you from the pack of other job applicants. You can get this edge through effective management of your body language. 

Many job applicants are sabotaging themselves because they are non-verbally communicating low confidence and low self-esteem. You need to focus on avoiding this in your next job interview.

To represent yourself successfully in a job interview you need to project an air of confidence and ability. High confidence sells while fear and doubt poisons the impression you make on others. A lack of confidence manifests itself in your body language and can ruin your chances in a job interview. Recruitment firms around the globe are reporting that candidates, frustrated by seemingly endless job interviews and fruitless job searches, are displaying negative body language patterns that cause them to fail their interviews. After a string of failed job interviews many job seekers tend to fall into a death spiral and this can be deadly for your job search.

The job interview death spiral happens after you have had several unsuccessful job interviews. The failed job interviews cause you to lose self-confidence, which is projected through your body language during your next job interview, contributing to your failure, which of course deepens your lack of confidence. This spiral can lead you into despair and cause you to eventually give up completely on finding a job.

To prevent this death spiral from happening it’s important to project confidence and avoid making a bad impression. Managing your body language and avoiding the most common body language mistakes is a very important part of an effective and successful job interview.

How important is body language? Research points out that up to 93% of the impact you have is influence by factors other than the words you use. It’s not enough to say the right things, you need to non verbally back up your words with the right image and impression. 

Try these five body language tips during your next job interview:

Use a firm handshake – In the mind of most people weak and limp handshakes equal weak character. Be sure you deliver your handshake with a firm grip while looking them right in the eye.

Watch your posture – There is a definitive difference between a confident posture and a posture that communicates low self-esteem. The best advice is the same your mother gave you, sit up straight (ramrod down your back) with your feet firmly planted on the floor. Again, slumping equals low self-esteem or even disinterest.

Make eye contact – Regular, strong eye contact is associated with confidence, honesty and boldness. Making eye contact is vital.

Monitor your vocal delivery – Experts estimate up to 38% of our communication is conveyed by our voice and vocal qualities, which means you need to pay attention not only to what you say but also how you say it. When we’re nervous we tend to speak faster and at a higher pitch, which robs of our authority. Take a tip from the acting profession and practice speaking slowly and deliberately.

Pay attention to the Interviewer’s body language – In today’s competitive job market being qualified for the job and having strong references is not enough. You need to convince the interviewer that you’ll be a good fit for the company and its values. You do this by reading the interviewer’s body language and responding appropriately. You need to show the proper amount of “social intelligence” and awareness to stand out from the other interviewees competing with you for the job.

So there you have it, five aspects of body language and nonverbal communication that will better your odds of succeeding in your next job interview. While having the correct body language might not win you the job, the wrong body language can definitely guarantee you won’t. 

Feng Shui Master – About the Author:

 

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How to Face an Interview- Body Language

May 19, 2011 Posted by

How to Face an Interview- Body Language

An essential part of non-verbal communication, body language is often a defining element in interviews. Positive body language goes a long way in conveying a good, suitable impression during an interview.

Here are a few tips that can help you project the right non-verbal message when facing interviews. Make sure you practice them well before facing an interview.

The first impression is often, the most lasting impression. So, the first thing that you need to take care of is your attire. Wear neat, clean and well ironed clothes. Opt for cool and light shades. For girls, hues of pink, purple, green and yellow are ideal. Guys can opt for lighter shades of cream, white and blue.

Body odour and bad breath are a real no-no. A few dabs of perfume or a spray or two of a faint deodorant along with a few pieces of mint should do the trick. Never use strong, overpowering perfumes or deodorants. You’ve to just smell pleasant, and not a walking-talking room freshener.

Prepare well and be on time. Reach the venue before hand, relax, have a cup of coffee. Tidy yourself and think about how you are going to perform instead of imagining how to difficult the interview is going to be.

When walking into the interviewer’s room, keep your head straight, shoulders erect and exude confidence. Don’t walk in with your head down, shoulders drooped or hands folded. You don’t really want to give an impression of a dejected person, severely lacking in confidence, do you?! Feel confident, and you’ll be confident. If the interviewer offers a handshake, give a firm one. A firm handshake doesn’t mean you try break his wrist. Don’t go too soft either. A cold-fish (mild) handshake indicates fear, hesitation and lack of confidence. Greet you interviewer with a genuine smile and say something appropriate like, “Pleased to meet you.” When you take your seat, relax into the chair. Maintain an erect posture, be comfortable. There’s no point slouching or shifting in your chair. You’ll just end up conveying the wrong impression. Slouching shows your laziness and shifting position may indicate that you are not comfortable with the interviewer. Very often, interviewees fold their hands across their body. Don’t. Folded hands are considered a defensive move, a gesture to feel more secure. Let your hands lie in your lap or on the armrests of your chair. Maintain a friendly expression to indicate positive attitude. Don’t sit as if interviewer is going to rip you apart and swallow you. When answering questions, keep you voice clear and audible. If you don’t understand a question, ask for a clarification. Don’t answer questions with a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Always try to elaborate the answer with relevant examples. Make sure you respond with your body language when the interviewer says something. Just a simple smile will do. This conveys your acknowledgment and will also quell the interviewer’s apprehensions or doubts as regards your personality, if any.

How To Face An Interview- Body Language by Nithin Mekhala of WriteYup.

About WriteYup: An online resource for readers and writers alike, WriteYup features articles focusing on a variety of topics including online advertising and marketing, business fundas, SEO, copywriting, book reviews and much more!

How to Face an Interview – Body Language

May 18, 2011 Posted by

How to Face an Interview – Body Language

Positive body language goes a long way in conveying a good, suitable impression during an interview. Here are some tips to help project the right message non-verbally in front of interviewers.

Make sure you practice them well before facing an interview. So, the first thing that you need to take care of is your attire. Wear neat, clean and well ironed. Opt for cool and light color shades. Guys can opt for lighter shades of cream, white and blue. A few dabs of perfume or a spray or two of a faint deodorant along with a few pieces of mint should do the trick. You’ve just want to smell pleasant, and not a walking-talking room freshener.

Reach the venue before hand, relax, have a cup of coffee. Tidy yourself up and think about how to make the interview pleasant , rather than to imagine how difficult the interview will be. When walking into the interviewer’s room, keep your head straight, shoulders erect and exude confidence. Do not go in with the head down, shoulders or hands folded or lowered. You don’t really want to give an impression of a dejected person, severely lacking in confidence, do you? Feel confident, and you’ll be confident. If an interviewer offers to shake hands, give a single firm handshAKE. A firm handshake doesn’t mean you try break his wrist. Do not go too soft or too hard. A cold-fish (mild) handshake indicates fear, hesitation and lack of confidence.

When you take your seat, relax into the chair. Maintaining an upright position, and most of all, be comfortable. There’s no point slouching or shifting in your chair. Slouching shows your laziness and shifting position may indicate that you are not comfortable with the interviewer. Very often, business job candidates put their hands over their bodies. Don’t. Folded hands is a defensive move, a gesture in order to feel safer. Let your hands lie in your lap or on the armrests of your chair. Maintain a friendly face to show positive attitude. Don’t sit as if interviewer is going to rip you apart and swallow you.

When answering questions, make sure you are clear with an audible voice. If you don’t understand a question, ask for a clarification. Do not respond to questions with a simple yes or no . Always try to elaborate the answer with relevant examples.

Just don’t overdue it. Often times, just a simple smile will do.

Chad Andrews has discovered a complete online job interview system to show job seekers how to prepare for a job interview and be successful in this tough and very competitive economy. To get instant access, go here: www.howtoprepareforajobinterview.info/success

Job interview body language

April 24, 2011 Posted by

Got a job interview? Have you thought about what your body language might say about you? Lifetracks explains how to manage your body language in a job interview, impress your employers and secure that new job. For more info on work, learning or training visit: {{{ www.lifetracks.com }}}
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